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Liam Archer (b. 1931)

Liam Archer (b. 1931)

Clontarf, Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Liam Archer details his father Liam Archer’s family background and his work as a sorter in the Telegraph Office in the GPO prior to the Rising in 1916. He provides an account of his father’s movements as a Section Leader before the Rising, his time in the Four Courts during the conflict and also an account of his uncle, Edward Archer. Both brothers were members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and they later joined the Volunteers. Track 2: Liam Archer’s injury inflicted during the Rising, and his subsequent treatment at Richmond Hospital, are discussed. Liam refers to his father Liam Archer’s diaries and discusses his orders to set Jameson’s Distillery on fire. Track 3: Contains a description of Liam Archer’s involvement in the War of Independence, working as an Intelligence Agent for Michael Collins, and a description of how the messages he deciphered from morse code were handed to Collins. The character of Liam Archer is recalled by his son, who grew up in Portobello Barracks. Track 4: The Civil War years and Liam Archer’s involvement in the Signals Corps in the Irish Army, being appointed Chief of Staff in 1958, are recalled. During the Emergency he became an advisor to Éamon de Valera, and was Director of G2 Intelligence. His sister married Dermot O’Hegarty, whose roles included Chief Clerk of the First Dáil, and Director of Organisation, IRA, 1920. Track 5: Contains a discussion on Liam Archer’s diaries which he began to write in 1937, and readings from same. The 1966 Commemorations and the pageantry at that time are recalled. Liam’s views on Irish history during the early period of the 20th century, as filtered through his father’s diaries, are described. Track 6: An introduction to “Cawstle Cawtholics” is included in this track, as is a discussion on the strict security in place at the GPO between 1916 and 1922. Liam Archer recalls coming into ownership of his father’s papers in the 1960s, and he describes his reaction to the contents.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.12 MB, 7.36 MB, 9.42 MB, 10.39 MB, 12.11 MB, 20.39 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-001
Subject: Archer, Liam (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 74:00


Eileen Quinn (b. 1931)

Eileen Quinn (b. 1931)

Dalkey, Co. Dublin

2013

 

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Track 1: This track contains an outline of the background of the Ashe family of Kinard, Co. Kerry, and of her father, Gregory Ashe’s childhood there. His emigration to America at the age of 17 is mentioned where he was to learn of the death of his brother, Tomás. Track 2: The tradition of teaching in the Ashe family, and Tomás Ashe’s love of music, particularly pipe-playing, and of the Irish language and culture, are discussed. Eileen Quinn recalls being present on the occasion of the burial of Peadar Kearney (who wrote the National Anthem), for which the grave of Tomás Ashe was opened. Track 3: The roles Gregory Ashe played in the War of Independence and the Civil War, following his return from America, are recalled. He lived with his sister, Nora Ashe, in Dublin during the War of Independence, where he met his future wife, Bríd Clare. The funeral of Tomás Ashe, in September 1917 in Dublin, is described by Eileen Quinn, as the details were related to her by her mother, Bríd, who was in attendance. Track 4: A discussion follows on the battle of Ashbourne. Eileen Quinn recalls being told of an invitation issued by Tomás Ashe to Roger Casement to come to Corduff School where Ashe taught, to discuss his adventures in Africa. A description is given of the way in which Gregory Ashe, while a member of the local IRA Brigade, saved Burnham House in Dingle from burning during the Civil War. The reasons why the Ashe family moved from Kinard on the Dingle Peninusla, to Straffan, Co. Kildare, are explored. Track 5: The meeting of Gregory Ashe with Ernie O’Malley, during which the latter recorded the former on his activities during the 1916-1923 period, is recalled. Eileen Quinn’s regret at the sale of family memorabilia some years ago is described, as is her pride in retaining family correspondence between her father, Gregory Ashe, and his brother Tomás and other family members. Track 6: Excerpts are read from a letter written by Gregory Ashe to his sister, Nora, dated 3 November 1917, following the death of their brother Tomás.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 10.69 MB, 6.67 MB, 9.68 MB, 7.78 MB, 9.37 MB, 3.94 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-002
Subject: Ashe, Tomás (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 52:31


Kevin Barry (b. 1941)

Kevin Barry (b. 1941)

Hacketstown, Co. Carlow

2012

 

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Track 1: The Barry family home near Hacketstown in Co. Carlow is described in detail, as is the Fenian connection to the Barrys. Track 2: The interviewee’s father, Michael Barry, and his two aunts, Kate and Sheila Barry, together with their republican affinities, are recalled. The capture of Kevin Barry in September 1920, his sentence to death in Mountjoy Jail and his execution, are described. Some of his personal belongings, such as his prayer book which was on his person when he died, are displayed. The interviewee’s father, Michael Barry, was also very active in the republican movement, and his activities are described. Track 3: Michael Barry was arrested at his home near Hacketstown in December 1920, and this event is recalled by his son, as are the executions carried out during the Civil War. Track 4: The difficulties experienced by Michael Barry in readjusting to normal farming and family life, following years on the run, are examined. Some literature and posters, printed for propaganda purposes prior to and during the years of the Civil War, are displayed and discussed. Track 5: Features a discussion on the Old IRA, comparing the organisation to its counterpart of more recent decades. Track 6: The interviewee’s membership of Fianna Fáil is discussed, and a secret passageway in the Barry home, which was used by revolutionaries on the run over the generations, is examined. Track 7: The funeral of Kevin Barry, and his later reinterment, are discussed, as are the great sacrifices endured by the Barry family, due to the strong republican stance to which they adhered. The refusal of a state pension by Kevin Barry’s mother, who lived in a flat in Molesworth Street in Dublin, and who died in the Bon Secours hospital in Glasnevin, is discussed.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 5.35 MB, 13.31 MB, 4.10 MB, 14.32 MB, 7.63 MB, 9.76 MB, 7.84 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-003
Subject: Barry, Kevin (Interviewee’s uncle)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 67:58


John Beazley (b. 1966)

John Beazley (b. 1966)

Killarney, Co. Kerry

2013

 

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Track 1: The background of the Beazley family from the vicinity of Killarney, Co. Kerry is discussed, and John Beazley’s connection to poet and writer, Piaras Béaslaí, who was born and reared in Liverpool, is described. While there, Béaslaí became a member of the Gaelic League and was later invited, by Cathal Brugha, to join the IRB in Dublin. Track 2: Piaras Béaslaí’s use of his writing talents to further the cause of Irish nationalism is explored. John Beazley explains that his information on his relative was gleaned from his own research, from which he discovered that Béaslaí was angered by the Countermanding Order issued by Eoin MacNeill, and that during the Rising, he was second in command to Ned Daly, based in Church Street and North King Street. Track 3: Contains an exploration of Piaras Beaslaí’s terms of imprisonment in Portland and Lewes jails, and his return to Killarney on many visits in the following years, keeping in close contact with the Irish Volunteers there. Track 4: Béaslaí’s election to the First Dáil as Sinn Féin member for East Kerry is recalled, and John Beazley’s discovery, early in his life, of the legacy of his cousin which had been downplayed by his family, is explained. The family resemblance between the interviewee and his cousin, Piaras Béaslaí, is commented upon. Track 5: The background to the 1926 publication of Piaras Béaslaí’s two volume biography of Michael Collins: Michael Collins and the Making of a New Ireland, is discussed. Also explained is Béaslaí’s pro-Treaty stance and details are provided about an important speech he made at the time, which served to influence many people. Track 6: Following the signing of the Treaty, Piaras Béaslaí travelled to America to speak in support of its terms, while his fellow countyman, Austin Stack, simultaneously spoke there against the Treaty. During the Civil War, Béaslaí worked as an Irish Army press censor, and this work is discussed. The position of Seán Maguire, son of Lily Merin, at the funeral of Piaras Béaslaí in 1965, is discussed in detail, together with an outline of the work of Lily Merin in identifying British agents prior to Bloody Sunday, 21 November 1920, and her close friendship with Piaras Béaslaí. The deposit of the Piaras Béaslaí Archive in the National Library of Ireland is also mentioned. Track 7: John Beazley describes the background to the Victorian house he occupies in Killarney, which was once owned by Col. Leahy.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.10 MB, 8.82 MB, 5.26 MB, 9.69 MB, 6.95 MB, 17.97 MB, 8.26 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-004
Subject: Béaslaí, Piaras (Interviewee’s second cousin)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 68:46


Joseph Bevan (b. 1932)

Joseph Bevan (b. 1932)

Miltown Rd., Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Charles Bevan’s career as a compositor, joining the Irish Volunteers, and his involvement in the Howth gun-running, are described. Rose Costello, Charles Bevan’s future wife, who was born in America of Cavan parents, is recalled. She was a member of Cumann na mBan under the command of May Gibney, Track 2: The events of Easter Week are described. The fact that Charles Bevan was the first man into the Four Courts on Easter Monday 1916, under the command of Ned Daly, is emphasised. Charles’s younger brother, Jim Bevan, was a messenger, his father, another brother, Tommy, and two sisters were also involved in the Rising. Charles Bevan worked with the Irish Press. His job as a compositor working with a Monotype hot-metal typesetting machine meant that he, who had a good knowledge of Irish, set the print for the Irish Constitution (1937), as gaeilge. Track 3: The courtmartial of Charles Bevan is recalled, as is his imprisonment in various English jails. The reasons why he wrote his account of the immediate aftermath of Easter Week 1916 during the 1950s, and the reasons why he did not become involved in the Civil War, are set out. Track 4: The visit to Kilmainham Jail made by Joseph Bevan with his father Charles, on the day of the official Commemoration at Easter1966, is recalled. Charles Bevan’s career as a compositor and then proofreader with the Irish Press newspaper, until the 1960s, is described. Track 5: Accounts given to Joseph Bevan by his father of incidents during the reign of the Black and Tans in Ireland are retold. Track 6: The misgivings, and a slight feeling of disapproval towards Free State personnel held by Charles Bevan are described, although he resigned from the IRA a few weeks before the outbreak of hostilities, being, as he said “unwilling and unable to take up arms” against his former comrades.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.89 MB, 8.41 MB, 8.75 MB, 5.90 MB, 11.64 MB, 5.89 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-005
Subject: Bevan, Charles (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 52:54


Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 1

Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 1

Sutton, Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Harry Boland discusses his family background, his grandfather James Boland, his father, Gerald, and his uncles, Harry and Edmund Boland. Harry Boland was responsible for the introduction of Michael Collins to the IRB and the interviewee recalls his father, Gerald, always distrusted Collins. Track 2: Harry Boland speaks of his family’s involvement in the 1916 Rising – due to the Countermanding Order by Eoin MacNeill, his father, Gerald, had gone home, and could get back into the city only as far as Jacob’s. Harry’s uncles were in the Metropole. Reminiscences about his schooldays, being educated by the Christian Brothers, and the 1916 Commemorations in his school in 1966, are also described by Harry Boland. Track 3: A discussion follows on the original letters written by the interviewee’s uncle, Harry, to Kitty Kiernan. The interviewee describes his memories of his father’s involvement in organising the Fianna Fáil party, being one of the key people in the party at that time. Track 4: The interviewee reflects on Arthur Griffith’s response to the signing of the Treaty, the influence exerted by Frank Aiken over Éamon de Valera during the Emergency, and the visit paid by de Valera to the Boland home when Gerald Boland was dying. An unexpected visit to the Boland home by Richard Mulcahy, who had been Minister for Defence in the Free State Government, is recalled. Harry Boland reads excerpts from letters written by Gerald Boland during his time in Mountjoy Prison, and he points out that some further letters still remain with the Department of Justice. Track 5: Details of the killing of Harry Boland during the Civil War, and memories of the character of Gerald Boland, are recalled. The reasons why Gerald Boland left the IRB after the 1916 Rising are explained. Track 6: Harry Boland describes the funeral of his uncle, Harry Boland, the attendance, and the iconic painting of the funeral by Jack Butler Yeats, RHA. The next generation, and the taking on of the mantle in political life, are discussed. The invitation by Harry Boland (interviewee) to Charles Haughey to join Fianna Fáil when in UCD, and his subsequent candidacy for election, are discussed. Gerald Boland’s military medals, and their importance within the Boland family, are mentioned. Track 7: Harry Boland speaks about his aunt, Kathleen Boland, a member of Cumann na mBan. The funeral of Gerald Boland and the people who attended are recalled. The Arms Trial is mentioned, along with the interviewee’s views of the new and the old IRA and the politics of today. (The arms trials of 1970 constituted a series of trials following the dismissal by Taoiseach Jack Lynch of Charles Haughey and Neil Blaney.)


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 5.55 MB, 8.85 MB, 8.56 MB, 7.63 MB, 8.67 MB, 12.50 MB, 15.77 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-006
Subject: Boland, Gerald and Boland, Harry (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 73:41


Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 2

Harry Boland (b. 1925), Part 2

Sutton, Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Harry Boland discusses the Fenian membership of his grandfather, James Boland, and the great passion for Irish freedom which he passed on to his children; Gerald, who was born in Manchester, Harry, Edmund and Kathleen. Gerald Boland’s time in Jacob’s during the 1916 Rising is discussed, and interviewee Harry Boland’s own visit to Jacob’s as a student, is recalled. Track 2: Details are provided about the reasons why Éamon de Valera sent a delegation, which included Gerald Boland, to Russia in 1924. Gerald Boland’s involvement in the formation of the Fianna Fáil party and his stance on the Boundary Commission are also discussed. Track 3: Interviewee Harry Boland discusses his introduction of Maureen Lemass to Charles Haughey while both were B.Comm. students in UCD. The setting up of the Haughey Boland accountancy business (now Deloitte Ireland) is explained. Bunny Carr, a friend of the Bolands, is mentioned and an anecdote involving the LDF is told. Track 4: The interviewee, Harry Boland, describes his introduction of Charles Haughey into politics. Track 5: The Fianna Fáil Tomás O’Cléirigh Cumann in Dublin is recalled, as are the people associated with it. It later divided and one section became known as the Harry Boland Cumann. The reasons for the interviewee’s later resignation are discussed, as is TACA, the successful fundraising group established to support the Fianna Fáil organisation at general elections. Track 6: Contains a discussion on The Arms Trial and the people associated therewith. The split in the Fianna Fáil party is described and the change in personality in Charles Haughey during his political life are explored. Track 7: Interviewee Harry Boland’s views on the ethos of the Fianna Fáil party during his father Gerald Boland’s time are described, and he also discusses his feelings of responsibility to support the organisation because of his family connections, though he feels that his continued support is now very much in doubt.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 8.75 MB, 6.43 MB, 8.88 MB, 6.56 MB, 13.35 MB, 9.68 MB, 5.36 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-007
Subject: Boland, Gerald and Boland, Harry (Interviewee’s father and uncle respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 64:22


Eileen Barrington (b. 1929)

Eileen Barrington (b. 1929)

Monkstown, Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Eileen Barrington, daughter of Kathleen Boland, recalls her mother’s descriptions of her family’s involvement in the preparations for, and the aftermath of the 1916 Rising. Kathleen Boland’s fundraising trip to America with Hanna Sheehy Skeffington is described. (Hanna Sheehy Skeffington was the widow of Francis Sheehy Skeffington who was shot illegally in Portobello Barracks by Captain Bowen-Colthurst at the beginning of the Rising.) She also gives an account of her paternal family. Track 2: Contains a description of the initial meeting of her mother with her future huband, Seán O’Donovan, who had attended the same school as Michael Collins at Lisavaird, Clonakilty, Co. Cork. Track 3: The story of the Russian Crown Jewels is explained in detail, with contributions from Eileen’s husband, Donal Barrington. Track 4: Kathleen Boland’s friends from the 1916 period are recalled, as is her father’s great interest in the Irish language. The military medals awarded to members of the Boland family, together with their whereabouts, are mentioned. Track 5: Kathleen Boland and Seán O’Donovan’s involvement in the Civil War is recalled, as are Eileen’s maternal and paternal families, and their involvement in republicanism. A Certificate of Appointment as the first Irish Ambassador from the Revolutionary Republic to the United States of America, given to Harry Boland, Kathleen’s brother, is mentioned. Eileen also describes the effects of the Civil War on her parents. Track 6: Eileen reads from a family record written by her father in 1971, detailing his education, his entry into the Irish Volunteers, his involvement in the War of Independence, the Civil War and his personal and working life.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 4.58 MB, 8.45 MB, 6.95 MB, 11.92 MB, 10.67 MB, 10.64 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-008
Subject: Boland, Kathleen and O’Donovan, Seán (Interviewee’s parents)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 58:03


Seán Boylan (b. 1943)

Seán Boylan (b. 1943)

Dunboyne, Co. Meath

2013

 

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Track 1: The involvement in the 1916 Rising of the four Boylan brothers, Seán, Ned, Joe and Peter, is described by Seán Boylan. He also describes the capture of his uncle, Peter Boylan, in Canada in 1915, when he was carrying despatches for the IRB. The background to the Boylan family in Dunboyne, Co. Meath, and their support of Charles Stewart Parnell, is also discussed. Track 2: The Boylan family’s involvement in the Rising, including that of his aunt, Mary Jane Boylan, is discussed. Seán recounts stories about the events of Easter Week as they were told to him by his father, Seán, and other family members. Track 3: Contains a description of the injury from explosives suffered by Seán Boylan Senior in 1919, during the War of Independence, his testimony to the Bureau of Military History and his dissatisfaction with this process. Seán Boylan recounts an anecdote told to him by a comrade of his father’s on the occasion of Seán Boylan’s removal following his death. Track 4: The reasons why the Boylan family took the Free State side following the signing of the Treaty, and the request to Seán Boylan Senior, by the Irish Army, for his assistance at the Curragh Camp in 1922, are explained. The interviewee describes his discovery, during the 1966 Commemorations, of the importance of his father’s role in Irish history. Tracks 5-7: Contains a discussion on the many family connections to the 1916 Rising which Seán encountered during his schooldays at Belvedere College in Dublin. His views on his father’s role in Irish history are discussed, as is the reason why the interviewee was called ‘Camillus’, being named after the Capuchin priest who attended his father on the night before his planned execution, which was later commuted.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 6.71 MB, 10.50 MB, 6.24 MB, 5.10 MB, 10.55 MB, 9.78 MB, 7.89 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-009
Subject: Boylan, Seán (Interviewee’s father)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 61:55


Edward Brennan (b. 1931)

Edward Brennan (b. 1931)

Tallaght, Dublin

2012

 

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Track 1: Edward Brennan outlines the British Army ranks of the three Dublin Brennan brothers in 1916, and explains that his father, Edward Brennan, served with the Irish Guards, and fought in France in 1915 to 1918. His uncle, Francis Brennan, served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and another uncle, Eugene Brennan, was in the Royal Irish Rifles, serving in France in 1914 and 1915. The Brennan family background in Usher’s Island in Dublin is explained. Track 2: Eighteen-year old Francis Brennan, who was stationed in Dublin during the 1916 Rising with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, was fatally wounded in Ellis Quay by the Irish Volunteers under Seán Heuston in the Mendicity Institution, and this is discussed by Edward Brennan, whose grandfather, Charles Brennan, was employed on the railways. Track 3: The interviewee’s aunt, Elizabeth Brennan, witnessed the British forces leaving Dublin in 1921, and she was recorded by her grandson. Edward Brennan discusses this recording. An excerpt from the recording is played, and the complete recording forms part of the Irish Life and Lore 1916 Rising Oral History collection. Track 4: Contains an explanation of the strong reaction of a family who had shared a tenement in Chapelizod with the Brennan family, when the latter family were rehoused in 1938. Edward Brennan’s uncle, Eugene Brennan, who served with the Royal Irish Rifles in WWI, was present at Christmas in 1914 when the British and the German troops ceased fire for the duration in a well-documented event in history. A short time later, Eugene Brennan was killed in France. Track 5: The interviewee explains that it was not until after his father’s death that he discovered that his uncle, Francis Brennan, was killed during the Rising. Tracks 6-7: Edward Brennan explains that his mother, Mary Marshall, was orphaned as a child and was placed in the South Dublin Union, from where she was later boarded out. Brennan family memorabilia is displayed and discussed.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 4.83 MB, 5.83 MB, 7.15 MB, 2.87 MB, 8.73 MB, 9.91 MB, 15.39 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: The 1916 Rising Oral History Collections
Product ID: CD191601-010
Subject: Brennan, Edward; Brennan, Francis and Brennan, Eugene (Interviewee’s father and uncles respectively)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 59:43


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