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Liz Dennehy (née Angland)

Liz Dennehy (née Angland)

Cullen, Co. Cork

 

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Liz Angland was brought up in Newmarket in the house known as Allen’s Mansion built in 1803, which her father had purchased along with the lands some years previously. She remembers the happy childhood years there, the breeding and rearing of horses, and the prizewinning jumper named ‘Miss Rita’. When Liz was 35 years old a marriage was arranged for her with Tim Dennehy, a farmer from Derraghcullen, and her dowry was £600. On her marriage she went to live in a thatched house at Cullen, where also lived her mother-in-law and her brother-in-law. She had a happy life there and reared four boys and two girls. She discusses the old customs, beliefs, superstitions and traditions of that time, religious practices, food stuffs such a black puddings and their production, the arrival of electricity, days out in Cork city and fair days in Newmarket. She returns in memory to her childhood days at Allen’s Mansion and the visits by the Allen family to their former home in Newmarket.


Number of files: 4
File size(s): 13.86 MB, 16.50 MB, 9.45 MB, 22.12 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Cork county, first series
Product ID: CDCK01-29
Subject: A life of diversity
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 67:47


Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan) (b. 1915)  (part 1)

Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan) (b. 1915) (part 1)

Sunday’s Well, Cork

2009

 

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The late Madoline O'Connell grew up at Lacaduv House on the Lee Road in Cork, where she enjoyed a charmed childhood with her three brothers. Her maternal grandfather was Sir Bertram Windle, President of UCC. Her paternal grandfather was an agent in Cork for Charles Stewart Parnell. Madoline has a clear recollection of being brought by her father to watch the city burn during the turbulent occupation by the Black and Tan forces. Madoline’s parents and the elder Fleischmann family were close friends, and her father was instrumental in securing the release of Aloys Fleischmann Snr from captivity when he was held by government order during World War I. Madoline Horgan qualified as a medical doctor in 1939, and shortly thereafter she left to work in Liverpool close to the hospital where her future husband, St John O’Connell worked as an orthopaedic surgeon. When the war ended the couple returned to Cork and Madoline recalls life in the city during that frugal period. She discusses her husband’s huge involvement in the horse industry – he became Chairman, and later President, of the Irish Flat Breeders Association in the 1970s.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 8.95 MB, 9.15 MB, 8.45 MB, 1.58 MB, 9.39 MB, 8.97 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Fleischmann Collection
Product ID: CDCKFL-04
Subject: An enduring friendship
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 50:52 and 39:41


Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan) (b. 1915)  (part 2)

Madoline O’Connell (née Horgan) (b. 1915) (part 2)

Sunday’s Well, Cork

2009

 

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The late Madoline O'Connell grew up at Lacaduv House on the Lee Road in Cork, where she enjoyed a charmed childhood with her three brothers. Her maternal grandfather was Sir Bertram Windle, President of UCC. Her paternal grandfather was an agent in Cork for Charles Stewart Parnell. Madoline has a clear recollection of being brought by her father to watch the city burn during the turbulent occupation by the Black and Tan forces. Madoline’s parents and the elder Fleischmann family were close friends, and her father was instrumental in securing the release of Aloys Fleischmann Snr from captivity when he was held by government order during World War I. Madoline Horgan qualified as a medical doctor in 1939, and shortly thereafter she left to work in Liverpool close to the hospital where her future husband, St John O’Connell worked as an orthopaedic surgeon. When the war ended the couple returned to Cork and Madoline recalls life in the city during that frugal period. She discusses her husband’s huge involvement in the horse industry – he became Chairman, and later President, of the Irish Flat Breeders Association in the 1970s. (This is a continuation.)


Number of files: 3
File size(s): 15.96 MB, 9.96 MB, 10.33 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Fleischmann Collection
Product ID: CDCKFL-05
Subject: An enduring friendship (contd)
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 50:52 and 39:41


William Spring (b. 1940)

William Spring (b. 1940)

 

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Track 1: Willie Spring recalls the earlier generations of the Springs of Ballyraymeen. Track 2: The first Spring house in the area was called Ballycrispin, and Willie Spring explains the Spring Rice connection Track 3: Willie Spring describes the village of Castlemaine in former times and the corn stores built by the Spring family. Track 4: Willie Spring explains that he is the fifth generation of the Spring family at Ballyraymeen, though the old house has been knocked down in recent times. Track 5: The maternal side of Willie Spring’s family, the Lyne family, is discussed. Also discussed is the great success of the Spring family in farm horse breeding over the generations. Track 6: The strength of the Catholic faith in the Spring family is recalled. Track 7: The connection with the Mason family is explored. Track 8: His neighbours, the Boyle family, and their entrepreneurial spirit are discussed.


Number of files: 7
File size(s): 13.17 MB, 5.49 MB, 8.96 MB, 19.80 MB, 3.97 MB, 6.98 MB, 13.81 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Great Houses of Cork and Kerry, first series
Product ID: CDGH01-33
Subject: Ballyraymeen and Ballycrispin Farms, Castlemaine, Co Kerry
Recorded by:
Length:


Marguerite (Gita) Weld (b. 1914)

Marguerite (Gita) Weld (b. 1914)

Rosewell House, The Curragh

2012

 

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Track 1: Following her marriage to Charlie Weld, the couple moved to England for two years, where Charlie trained horses. The family background of her parents and grandparents. Track 2: Returned to Ireland, living near the Phoenix Park, where they trained horses. Memories of travelling to the horse sales in Newmarket in the 1950s, with Dermot, her young son. Track 3: The logistics of moving home and horses to Rosewell Stud in the 1950s; building up the business of horse breeding; the owners for whom her husband trained horses. Track 4: The owners and trainers in the Curragh area; her patrons over the years; getting involved in breeding horses with her father, and later her brother; the jockeys the family retained over the years. Track 5: With prompting from Dermot, recalled the early days of sending horses overseas to race meetings, and hearing race results on Michéal Ó hEithir’s radio programme. Memories also of Dermot’s first win as an amateur jockey, when he was fifteen. Track 6: The stable hands, the yard men and the grooms who worked for the Welds over the years. The days of transporting horses to race meetings by CIÉ, parading them from the train stations and through the town to the racecourse. Track 7: The business of breeding and selling horses; the purchase of Glen Vale Stud in Tipperary and later Piper’s Hill Stud in Naas and finally Spring Bank in the Curragh. Track 8: The importance of planning and choosing the appropriate race for a horse to fulfil its potential. Anecdote of the origins of her nickname Gita.


Number of files: 8
File size(s): 5.05 MB; 5.14 MB; 7.52 MB; 4.26 mb; 7.70 MB; 11.44 MB; 9.45 MB; 6.10 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Horse Racing Ireland Oral History Collection
Product ID: CDHRI01-13
Subject: Part 2 – A second visit to Rosewell Stud
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 68:00


Larry Slevin (b. 1926)

Larry Slevin (b. 1926)

Clane, Co. Kildare

2009

 

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A native of Clane, as were all before him, Larry Slevin spent all his adult life working as a groom at Blackhall Stud. His father drove a bread van for Boland’s Bakery during Larry’s childhood. John Noonan facilitated this recording at Hazelwood Nursing Home, where Larry recites some old local rhymes, and recalls his long working life with Lord Astor. He remembers the hay mangers, people who used to transport loads of hay on horses and drays with side boards all the way to Dublin. Larry declares that one could barely see the horses’ heads protruding from the hay loads. He mentions Josie Doyle, who would come to Clane on her ass and car to sell sweets and Chester cake, and also recalls Aggie Weir who ran a boarding house in the village for ‘tramps.’ He remembers some local people who had the gift of curing ailments such as shingles, which was known as ‘wildfire.’ Larry’s mother was an unusual lady in that she sometimes dreamed of the funeral of a local person, and before too long, the person in question would leave this world! Larry’s grandfather was captain of the local football team in 1887, a very successful team in its heyday. The team wore white flour bags fashioned into football jerseys, which lead to the Kildare team’s present name the 'Lillywhites.’


Number of files:
File size(s): 49.03 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Kildare county, first series
Product ID: CDKD01-18
Subject: Memories of Blackhall estate
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 53:42


Martin Carrigan (b. 1936) and Father Tom Carrigan (b. 1935)

Martin Carrigan (b. 1936) and Father Tom Carrigan (b. 1935)

Clarabricken, Co. Kilkenny

2009

 

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This recording was compiled at the ancestral home at Clarabricken, where the Carrigan family has lived for many generations. Martin and Tom Carrigan are brothers, and their home is famous for the craft of uilleann pipe-making. The brothers’ grandfather, Nicholas Carrigan, began this great craft and his most prized possession was a set of pipes (an Egan set) once owned by Michaleen ‘Gumba’ O’Sullivan. This set is now in the custody of Martin Carrigan and in the recording a very old Limerick lament may be heard, played on these pipes. Fr Tom Carrigan recalls the activities of his father, William, during the Troubles in Woodstock. The house at Clarabricken was always known as a safe house during these turbulent days. Nicholas Carrigan, the brothers’ grandfather, owned horses of an unusual breed, and the Travellers would bring their mares to the horses for servicing, and meanwhile, would play some tunes on the pipes, which Nicholas enjoyed. They began to swap tunes, and Nicholas began to repair their pipes when necessary. Martin Carrigan explains that his own interest in the pipes and their construction, began when his earlier hurling days were over. He became involved with his father William’s work, and in the recording he compares the old ways of restoration with the new. Fr Tom Carrigan spent forty years in California working as a priest, and in the recording he discusses his experiences over these years.


Number of files: 5
File size(s): 9.49 MB, 10.62 MB, 8.13 MB, 5.82 MB, 24.15 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Kilkenny (Clara parish), third series
Product ID: CDKK03-13
Subject: Music and memories
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 63:42


Eddie Mulrooney (b. 1936)

Eddie Mulrooney (b. 1936)

Dunbell, in the parish of Clara, Co. Kilkenny

2009

 

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Four generations of the Mulrooney family have lived at Prospect House Dunbell, Clara. Eddie Mulrooney recalls his ancestors, and the historical house in which they lived. It was regarded as a safe house during the Troubles of the 1920s, and on an occasion shortly after Eddie’s marriage to his wife Angela, a cache of eighteen hand grenades was discovered hidden under the floorboards when a new kitchen was being installed. Eddie discusses the work of the farm, the ploughing, the tilling and sowing, the work of the reaper and binder, and the workmen who gave long service to the family. He discusses the formation of the Maddoxtown Group Water Scheme in the early 1970s, which has stood the test of time. He discusses his love of hurling and the breeding of horses for showjumping.


Number of files: 6
File size(s): 7.03 MB, 4.61 MB, 11.05 MB, 17.42 MB, 10.83 MB, 12.45 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Kilkenny (Clara parish), third series
Product ID: CDKK03-22
Subject: Local history and farming
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 69:22


Tom Brennan (b. 1935)

Tom Brennan (b. 1935)

Clifden, Clara, Co. Kilkenny

2009

 

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Tom Brennan owns and runs Coolgrange Stud Farm. The family home was originally occupied by the local Catholic curate. Tom discusses his memories of the coming together of a group of local people in the 1950s to organise a fete lasting several weeks, to lift the spirits of the local people, during difficult times financially. Tom’s entrepreneurial talents are very evident during the course of the recording, as he discusses the origins of the stud farm and the purchasing of highly bred stallions, such as The King of Diamonds and Lawton’s Flight, “the best jumping horse Ireland ever had.”


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 66.36 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Kilkenny (Clara parish), third series
Product ID: CDKK03-23
Subject: An entrepreneurial spirit
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 72:38


Oliver Burke (b. 1937)

Oliver Burke (b. 1937)

Tullamore, Co. Offaly

2012

 

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Track 1: Growing up in Ballydroichead, in a cottage previously lived in by his forefathers. In 1961, joined the Williams Company as a lorry driver, servicing the branch houses. Recalled the routes he travelled, covering the entire country from Donegal to Kerry. Memories of his father, Tom, also a driver for the company, who used a dray horse. Track 2: Recalled Matt Farrell, his first transport manager, and Tom Fitzgerald, the manager of fertilisers which he delivered to farmers for their crops in the early spring, returning at harvest time to collect the bagged grain. Track 3: The heavy manual work prior to the arrival of forklifts, of loading and unloading grain bags with an average weight of up to twenty stone. Track 4: Memories of his father, Tom, who had worked in the distillery; the practice of ‘beating down the mash’. Track 5: Following retirement, some success in breeding horses. Discussed the genealogy of his maternal family.


Number of files: 5
File size(s): 8.76 MB, 7.22 MB, 4.54 MB, 7.45 MB, 10.74 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Tullamore Dew (Offaly eighth series)
Product ID: CDOF08-01
Subject: Tullamore Dew Distillery, Tullamore, Co. Offaly
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe – Irish Life and Lore
Length: 42:06


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