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Patsy Holmes (b. 1902)

Patsy Holmes (b. 1902)

Mallow, Co. Cork

2004

 

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Track 1: Patsy Holmes recalls his early years in Whitechurch, Co. Cork. He joined the local Volunteers with his brother, Jim, as a young man and he describes his days "on the run" with his brother, and the hideouts they frequented. He mentions his friend Dan Clancy, who was murdered while a prisoner on Spike Island, and he recalls his involvement in the raid on the barracks in Fermoy, led by Liam Lynch, which heralded the War of Independence. Track 2: His arrest and imprisonment in Spike Island in a condemned cell with a man named Buckley and another comrade are described. His subsequent transfer in a gunboat, The Heather to Ballykinlar, near Downpatrick, Co. Down is recalled as are memories of his time in Ballykinlar, the football matches and the other Volunteers who were imprisoned there. Track 3: His memories of the Truce, his release and working in an abattoir in Mallow. He explains that he shook hands with General Michael Collins in Mallow on the night before Collins's death. Track 4: His involvement in the Rathcoole ambush and his transport of the firearms to the site are described, and Patsy sings a number of local rebel songs. Track 5: Another rare local rebel ballad is sung, relating to The War of Independence, the flying of the Irish flag, and the presence of the RIC in Mallow town. Track 6: The shooting of General Liam Lynch on the Knockmealdown Mountains and Patsy’s presence nearby on that day are recalled. He discusses his guarding of Major Hannon, who had been abducted and taken to Kilmallock. He also describes driving cattle from Mallow to Killarney fair. Track 7: A 1916 ballad is sung, and later a further ballad concerning an eviction. Track 8: An old ballad called "The Fenian Gun" and another relating to 1916 may be heard. Track 9: Patsy Holmes describes his frugal upbringing, and he explains that he was a witness to the blowing up of Mallow bridge during the Troubles.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 45.75 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Witnesses to Independence
Product ID: CD1916-06A
Subject: The War of Independence
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 87:11


Dan Keating (b. 1902)

Dan Keating (b. 1902)

2005

 

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I have had the pleasure of knowing Dan Keating for many years and because I had recorded his recollections in the past, I was aware that he was a mine of information on events in this country during the early days of the 20th century. I travelled to Dan's home in March 2005 and immediately we settled ourselves, it became obvious that he was anxious to return in memory to the turbulent days of his early youth in rural Kerry. Dan was born in January 1902 and at the age of 14 years, he remembers hearing about a large contingent of Volunteers which had gathered at the Rink in Tralee on Easter Sunday 1916. One of the organisers was Paddy Cahill, who was later to be involved in the Lispole Ambush. In 1921 Dan Keating joined the IRA Boherbee B Company. He named for me the different IRA divisions in Tralee and their respective leaders. He spoke about the several British Regiments occupying the Barracks in the town - The Scottish Borderers, the Essex Regiment and the Lancashire Regiment ("The Lancs") - and he maintained that "The Lancs" treated the people more humanely than some of their counterparts. Dan was involved in the Castlemaine Ambush in June 1921 where five RIC men were killed and several others wounded and spoke of his memories of that day. The previous April Denny O'Loughlin had been shot by the IRA in Knightley's Bar in Lower Bridge Street, Tralee, and Dan says that he and Jimmy "Nuts" O'Connor and Percy Hanafin were "fingered" for this and went on the run. They spent a lot of their time in safe houses around Firies where there was always a welcome for them. While the famed Kerry footballer, John Joe Sheehy of Tralee was still on the run in 1924, his friend from North Kerry, Con Brosnan, a Free State Army Officer, went to Dublin to plead with headquarters to allow him a week without capture before and after the All-Ireland Final. The Kerry team which went on to win the Final that year was captained by one John Joe Sheehy.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 62.34 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Witnesses to Independence
Product ID: CD1916-18
Subject:
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length:


John Clohessy (b. 1920)

John Clohessy (b. 1920)

Robertstown, Co. Kildare

2009

 

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Clare is the birthplace of John Clohessy, who joined the army during the Emergency years. When Bord na Móna was recruiting staff in 1944, he obtained a position with them and began work in Timahoe. After a short time he was transferred to Killinthomas where he was placed in charge of the orderlies. He was later moved to Mucklon. He describes the Nissen huts and the food, and he recalls the pastimes such as handball and football. He was promoted to stock-keeper in charge of all requirements, and the dishing out rations. He recalls the work clothes and the motor bikes for the gangers. He retired in 1985, having spent 42 years with the Bord.


Number of files: 5
File size(s): 3.88 MB, 11.12 MB, 7.33 MB, 19.17 MB, 10.86 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Bord Na Móna
Product ID: CDBM-04
Subject: Stock keeper
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length:


Eamonn Wall (b. 1940), lecturer In Biochemical Science and Medical Laboratory Science (part 2)

Eamonn Wall (b. 1940), lecturer In Biochemical Science and Medical Laboratory Science (part 2)

2009

 

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In this recording with Eamonn Wall, the focus is on his involvement in the GAA at the CIT campus. Ever since his arrival at the RTC he had an involvement in hurling and football, which played a central role in the students’ development. He speaks about the successful staff football team, and about the history of the Sigerson (football) and Fitzgibbon (hurling) Cups, as well as the Ashbourne Cup for camogie. He himself was involved, from the early days, in organising the football teams. Fulltime sports officers and coaches are now in place for more than ten years who bring their skills and abilities to the organisation and development of games to CIT. When RTC Cork first opened its fledgling campus, sports facilities were not a priority as they consisted of two tennis courts and an all weather hockey pitch. Through the far sighted and enlightened efforts of the former Director Dr Pat Kelleher and former Registrar Brendan Goggin, lands were purchased which allowed for the development of the modern facilities now available for all sports activities. Eamonn Wall discusses the bonding between the students and the staff, and strongly feels that sport pulls people together. He also speaks of the breaking down of barriers between the Institutes of Technology and Universities, due to the establishment of new structures for GAA games in higher education.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 35.10 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Cork Institute of Technology
Product ID: CDCKIT-08
Subject: A passion for sport
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 38:27


Batt  O’Keeffe (b. 1945), former lecturer

Batt O’Keeffe (b. 1945), former lecturer

2009

 

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Batt O’Keeffe was born in Cullen, Co Cork, into a family of six boys and one girl. His father was a relieving officer, cattle dealer and farmer, and his mother ran a small village shop. He was educated at St Brendan’s College, Killarney, of which he has very fond memories, and while there he excelled in Gaelic football and also enjoyed his game of handball. He decided against attending third-level college full-time and began work with the ESB as store manager and administration officer, and in 1966 he began his studies at evening classes, and graduated with a BA prior to taking up a teaching post at the Crawford. He taught English and general subjects to Technical Leaving Certificate classes, a job which he very much enjoyed. The new regime at Bishopstown brought about many positive changes, as new disciplines were introduced and new standards of achievement became possible. Batt O’Keeffe fondly remembers Jim Roche who was the first Principal at the RTC. He also recalls the staff football team and their great social gatherings, his introduction to politics which followed his involvement with his local community in Ballincollig, and he discusses his present position (2009) as Minister for Education and his ambitions for the future of education in Ireland.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 46.77 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Cork Institute of Technology
Product ID: CDCKIT-33
Subject: A teacher and a politician
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 51:13


Liam Hodnett (b. 1944), head of Department of Building and Civil Engineering

Liam Hodnett (b. 1944), head of Department of Building and Civil Engineering

2009

 

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Liam Hodnett was reared in Turner’s Cross and received his primary education at South Presentation and his secondary education at CBS, Sullivan’s Quay. He was awarded a scholarship to study Civil Engineering at UCC, graduating in 1966. He began his career in Wexford working for the ESB and later worked in Dublin with CIE for four years. He returned to work in Cork for the Harbour Commissioners. He recalls his involvement with the Tivoli works, the Ringaskiddy works and harbour dredging. After two years with the Harbour Commissioners he decided to take a consultancy job in structural engineering with Malachy Walsh and Partners, with whom he worked for four years. In 1976 the position of Head of Department of Building and Civil Engineering at the RTC in Bishopstown became vacant and Liam Hodnett was appointed to the position. He recalls the International Apprenticeship Competition at the RTC and says that this gave education in craftsmanship “a shot in the arm”, and was to create a “landbridge to Europe”. He speaks about the architecture of the 1950s and 1960s when the mantra was “form follows function”, and about the introduction and importance of the course in Architectural Technology. Liam has a strong loyalty to St Finbarr’s GAA club for which he began playing football from the age of 13 and he has much to say about the politics, the structure and the amateur status of the Association.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 47.21 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Cork Institute of Technology
Product ID: CDCKIT-44
Subject: A lifetime in engineering
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 51:42


Jimmy O'toole, Age 58,

Jimmy O'toole, Age 58,

Kilkenny Road, Carlow town, Co. Carlow

2007

 

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This is a most interesting recording with Jimmy O'Toole, who is a native of Rathbawn, Tullow. He begins by describing his research into the Knights Hospitallers and their purpose in the area. James was educated at Grange national school, and has researched and written about the local football club and its community. The town of Carlow itself, its people and its workplaces are described in this recording.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 52.56 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Carlow county, first series
Product ID: CDCW01-17
Subject: The work of an author and historian
Recorded by: Maurice O'Keeffe
Length: 57:32


Ted Joyce (aged 85)

Ted Joyce (aged 85)

Borris, Co. Carlow

2007

 

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Ted Joyce played for Carlow in the 1944 All-Ireland Football semi-final against Kerry. He is one of the few survivors from the team. His parents were publicans in the town of Borris and he played for Ballymurphy, a local football club. His passion and love for the game are clearly evident in this recording.


Number of files: 1
File size(s): 39.83 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Carlow county, first series
Product ID: CDCW01-41
Subject: A life long interest in Gaelic football
Recorded by: Maurice O'Keeffe
Length: 43:36


FR. SEAN Ó GALLCHÓIR, BORN 1946, GORT AN CHOIRCE

FR. SEAN Ó GALLCHÓIR, BORN 1946, GORT AN CHOIRCE

2010

 

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Fr. Sean Ó Gallchóir has been Parish Priest of Gortahork for ten years and previously served as curate in Gweedore where he grew up. In 1971, following his ordination, he spent twenty years as a teacher at the boys’ boarding school at Falcarragh and he discusses the changes in education over those years. He is passionate about the GAA and about Gaelic football and has made a great contribution to the sporting historical record by his collection of the statistics of games over many years, which have been published. He has a great love of the local Irish culture and its promotion and he discusses his opinion of the importance of the church in a rural locality.


Number of files: 2
File size(s): 17.05 MB, 6.32 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Donegal county, first series
Product ID: CDDL01-33
Subject: A priest and a statistician
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 25:34


BRIAN McENIFF, BORN 1942, BUNDORAN

BRIAN McENIFF, BORN 1942, BUNDORAN

2010

 

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The Holyrood Hotel in Bundoran, owned by the McEniff family, was the venue for this recording with Brian McEniff. Brian’s father was a native of Monaghan and his mother was a member of the Begley family of County Tyrone. The couple came to Bundoran to set up a café and grocery business in earlier days and Brian and his siblings grew up in the business premises. Brian attended Cathal Brugha College of Catering before emigrating to Canada where he worked at the Royal York Hotel in Toronto while, simultaneously, working for an insurance company. In 1966, he returned to Bundoran where his parents had purchased the Holyrood Hotel and two years later, following the death of his father, Brian took over the business. He played Gaelic football with the Bundoran Club which then amalgamated with St. Joseph’s, Ballyshannon and went on to achieve great success. He discusses his long football career, both as a player and as a trainer. In the latter part of the recording Brian discusses the history of his native town and the factors that create the vibrant community that live and work there.


Number of files: 5
File size(s): 8.37 MB, 11.07 MB, 20.02 MB, 9.33 MB, 19.82 MB
Bitrate: 128 kbps
Download time limit: 48 hours

Audio series: Donegal county, first series
Product ID: CDDL01-62
Subject: A footballer and hotelier
Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe
Length: 75:05


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